Homemade Fruit Gift Wrap

_MG_9902Lately I’ve been obsessed with the idea of making my own gift wrap. While there are so many beautiful options readily available out there, I find that people notice when you’ve taken the time to paint it and that makes the gift all the more special.

In an effort to stretch out the summer, I’ve been going a little crazy with fruit-themed projects before the produce switches into Fall mode (hence The Perfect Fruit TartThailand-Inspired Fresh Fruit Shakes, & Homemade Strawberry Rhubarb Pie). For the upcoming birthday and housewarming presents I’ll be gifting this month, I decided to stick to this theme and make fruit-inspired gift wrap with watercolors and acrylics. I love how colorful and sweet they looked in the end, especially as a group.


Materials:

  • Plain white gift wrap
  • Spray paint (optional, but it’s the ideal paint for your base layer)
  • Watercolors or acrylics
  • Paint brushes (one thick, one thin)
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Green ribbon and bows

First, place a large piece of scrap paper or newspaper on the ground to protect from any mess you will make. Then cut the wrapping paper into the sizes of paper you need towrope your gifts. You’ll want to paint them one at a time, so place your first piece on the ground and tape down the edges.

Tart (1 of 19)

Going into this project, I already had two colors of spray paint, olive green and pink, so I went ahead and used those to make the base for the watermelon, kiwi, and strawberry papers. Simply spray an even coat over the paper and set aside to dry (for the watermelon, do half of it pink, half green, and leave a fuzzy strip of white in the middle).

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Using watercolors or watered-down acrylics, coat the remaining pieces of paper until completely covered. It may be a little wrinkly from the water (which is why the spray paint is ideal), but those waves will smooth out when you wrap your gift.

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Allow the base coats to dry completely.

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Once dry, you can begin painting details onto the papers. The amount of detail it up to you. I added seeds to the watermelon as well as a few strokes of darker green, I also add seeds to the strawberry and kiwi. I used acrylic to paint the pulp into the orange and lemon papers, and a simple black star to the blueberry. For the grapes, I liked the base enough to leave them alone.

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Once the paper is completely dry, wrap the gifts and decorate with green ribbon. Hope you have as much fun making these as I did!

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Tart (1 of 1)

Happy wrapping!

-Kirby

Lemon Flower Arrangement

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When life gives you lemons, make lemon filled vases for your flowers! The saying goes something like that… right? A flower arrangement is the easiest and most elegant way to elevate your home, but most people (like us) can’t afford fresh flower bouquets every week. So when we do buy them for celebratory occasions or when we need a little cheerer-upper, they make our homes feel extra special.

The addition of sliced lemons takes an already beautiful arrangement to the next level, just in time for the warm June weather. It’s more time consuming for sure, but the result is worth it. Our lemon flower arrangement is the perfect addition to the patio table, just in time for this week’s early summer BBQs and rosé nights with the girls.


Materials:

  • Flowers
  • Lemons (each lemon makes about 5-6 slices, so the number depends on your vase size)
  • Toothpicks
  • A vase that stands straight up (the angular ones don’t work with the lemons)
  • Scissors
  • A knife and chopping board

lemon flowers (2 of 20)


Slice your lemons into even circles about 1/4 – 1/2 inch thick. If they are too thin, you will see the toothpicks so best to stay on the thick side just in case.

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Use toothpicks to connect strands of lemons. Each strand should be the height of your vase.

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Our vase was quite tall so we made alternating strands of 3 and 4 lemons.

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Trim your flowers and arrange them inside the vase with water. Carefully insert the strands of lemons along the circumference of the vase. We used alternating lengths of strands so that the lemons filled all of the gaps.

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After about fifteen minutes of intense fiddling, you are done and your efforts will be well worth it.

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lemon flowers (14 of 20)Happy June!

-Kirby and Michelle