Doorknob Necklace Hanger

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Whether you’re moving out of the dorms or out of your parents’ homes, we’re sure everyone remembers that incredible feeling of independence living in an apartment for the first time. No matter how dingy and cramped it feels, having a place to call your own makes it almost okay. Since moving to the apartments, we’ve constantly been looking for ways to make the most of our limited space. Even more, we wanted to find a way to make the white walls and dull carpets feel less like a college apartment and more like a home.

We love the vintage/thrifty look that you can find at stores like Anthropologie, but our college budget unfortunately doesn’t always sustain these decorative tastes. After coming across these cute doorknobs, we fell in love and knew we had to find a way to incorporate them into the apartment.

This Anthropologie-inspired necklace hanger is the perfect addition to any room because it showcases your jewelry on the wall in a way that is elegant and decorative rather than merely shoving it away in a box. Even more, it is super affordable!


Materials

  • Plank of wood
  • Sandpaper
  • Wood stain and rag
  • Wood protectant (we used fast-drying Polyurethane)
  • Power drill
  • Hack saw
  • Decorative doorknobs (we bought ours here)

First, sand your plank of wood down to make sure all the edges are smooth and even. Splinters are no fun for anyone!

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Once you’re happy with the surfaces of the wood, wipe it down with a wet rag to remove leftover wood shavings. Now you are ready to stain it! To get the color the correct richness, it usually takes three layers. Rub it on the wood with a rag and let it dry for 15 minutes. Then, rub off the excess stain with a damp rag and let the leftover stain dry for 3 hours. Repeat 3 times for best results.

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Next, spray the wood with fast-drying Polyurethane to add a protective seal.

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After the wood has been stained and dried, drill 4 holes equal distance from each other into the wood. On the back side, drill a slightly larger hole (only part-way) into the wood to countersink the washers and nuts. This is really important so that once it is time to hang the necklace hanger, it will be flush against the wall.

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Finally, you’re ready to pull out the knobs. Use a hacksaw, first, to saw the knob screws down to the right length for the wood plank. Then, screw in the washers and nuts tightly to secure the knobs.

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From here, you have a few options to hang the necklace hanger on the wall. You can install sawtooth picture hangers (like these here) onto the board and secure on the wall with nails. This is the sturdiest option. Because of our college living arrangements we were unable to nail into the walls. Instead, we used command strips to secure the necklace hanger.

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Now add your jewelry for the final touch!

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Happy Decorating!

– Kirby and Michelle

 

 

 

Lavender Print Thank-You Cards

_mg_7168I hope everyone had an incredible New Years Eve! I’ve been visiting my boyfriend in London for the holidays and we took the weekend to drive down to Brighton, one of my favorite beach towns. It has narrow, cobblestone shops like Diagon Alley from Harry Potter and a cool old pier with carnival games and an arcade (I’m weirdly obsessed with arcades). We rented an Airbnb with ten other friends and spent the day eating, playing games and indulging in lots of champagne. Heading back to school next week will be a very sad reality.

As I head into the new year, my first project is always to write my thank you cards from Christmas. It’s so important to show appreciation for the kindness others have shown, and acknowledging all of the love and support around me helps me enter the new year with a positive attitude. I have a lot of thank-yous this year, and I decided to make my own cards with these simple yet elegant lavender prints. Flower prints are so easy to do and so pretty. You can make them with pretty much any flowers, but I used the leftover lavender from my trip to Ojai this past summer (see my lavender sachets here).

If I could make a thank you card for every one of you that reads this blog, I would. I am so appreciative of the support from all over the world.


Materials

  • Blank cards (I used white and olive green)
  • Acrylic paint (I used purple, dark green, and lavender)
  • A gold leaf pen (I love this one here)
  • Lavender (or whatever flowers you have in the house)
  • Small Paintbrush

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Mix your paints on a thick piece of paper or a palette until you have the colors you would like to use. I chose deep purple for the green cards and dark green for the white cards.

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Using a brush, carefully dab the paint onto  the lavender until it is fully coated on one side.

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Gently press the paint-coated side of the lavender onto the front of the card. Then repeat the process until you’ve filled the card to your liking. Be sure to choose multiple stalks of lavender so that there is some variation in size and shape.

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Allow the cards to dry before you add the additional color details. I chose lavender for  the green cards and a gold for the white cards. Using a thin paintbrush, add small dots of lavender paint to the dark purple prints, and add gold details to the green prints using the gold leaf pen.

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Once they have fully dried, you can begin writing your cards!

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Happy New Year!

-Kirby

 

Olaf Marshmallows

_mg_7579Can you think of anything Olaf would rather do than soak in a piping hot cup of cocoa? This week we decided to up our hot chocolate game by crafting these adorable marshmallows shaped and decorated like Olaf from Disney’s Frozen. We made them for our friends (and us, really) to enjoy, but assemble them on marshmallow skewers and you’ve got a perfect addition for your next Holiday party, and a guaranteed smash hit with kids.

We have finally finished exams and are splitting up, headed to San Francisco and London for the Winter break. Nothing sounds better than a little downtime with family and friends. We hope you all have incredible holidays filled with love and laughter (or shall we say “Olaf”ter) – we’ll be back after the New Year with more new content!


Materials:

  • Flat marshmallows (we got the marshmallow “stackers” from Target)
  • Royal icing (find our recipe here)
  • Marshmallow skewers
  • Ziplock bags (or piping bags)
  • Black and orange food coloring
  • Chocolate sprinkles
  • Hot cocoa

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Carefully cut half of the marshmallows with a sharp knife to look like the bottom half of Olaf’s face. It’s a bit of an odd shape, but we just cut the bottom two corners off at an angle. Then cut the remaining marshmallows to look like the top off his head, which looks like a small trapezoid.

Make your royal icing; you want it to be stiff icing so don’t add any water. Spoon half of it into a ziplock bag and snip the corner to make a piping bag. Then divide the remaining icing in half and dye one half orange and the other black. Once again put them in bags and snip the corners. Make sure your cut is very small so that you can easily achieve detail in your decoration. Pipe the white icing onto the longer edge of the bottom half of Olaf’s face, then attach the trapezoid shape, also on the longer side.

Skewer them onto the sticks, careful not to deform them. Then begin decorating with the icing. Use the black to make the mouth.

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Make black dots slightly larger than the eyeballs, and use the white to make the eyes on top of them. Then make the pupils with the black. Finally, add an orange nose and black eyebrows.

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To finish them, make a dot of white icing on the top of Olaf’s head, and use it to attach three chocolate sprinkles to make his hair.

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Voila, you are finished! Now you can sit back and relax with a pot of hot cocoa and your adorable marshmallows.

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Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

-Kirby and Michelle

 

Mason Jar Gingerbread Cookies

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In my family, the day after Thanksgiving has always meant the first day of Christmas. It may seem a bit early to some, but with all of us living in different places it’s one of the last times we’ll be together before Christmas Day itself. So in the true holiday spirit, our house begins to resemble Santa’s workshop as we all get to work. My dad hangs the lights outside, my sister and I grab container after container of ornaments and stockings off the shelves in the garage to bring inside, and my mom whips up some homemade hot chocolate and cookies for us all – Noodles hovering close by, waiting for scraps of food to be dropped to the kitchen floor. With a full fire going and Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and other members of the Rat Pack playing in the background, we all gather around to decorate the Christmas tree.

It’s truly one of the most special days of the year in the Embury household, and something I wish I could share with everyone. While I can’t personally invite every person I know into my house, I did the next best thing. I found a way to bring our holiday festivities to you through some of my favorite gingerbread cookies!

These were very simple and affordable to make, which is always a plus on my college budget. They make the perfect gift for friends and family, and go a long way in spreading the holiday cheer. I made quite a few at home over Thanksgiving break, but saved one to enjoy with Kirby and our friends in Los Angeles.


Materials:

  • 1 quart-sized mason jar
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • Small spoon or ladle
  • Twine
  • Gingerbread man cookie cutter
  • Fabric to cover mason jar lid
  • Card stock paper to write instructions
  • Pen
  • Scissors
  • Hole Punch

Mix 2 cups of flour with the baking soda and baking powder. Mix the remaining 1 1/2 cups flour with the ginger, cloves, cinnamon, and allspice. Layer the ingredients in the mason jar starting with the flour and baking powder mixture, then the brown sugar, and finally the flour and spice mixture. Pack firmly between layers. I used a small metal ladle to press down each layer as I went. Seal the mason jar tightly with the lid.

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Fold a piece of card stock paper over and write down the ingredients and directions on the inner section. I used white card stock so that you could clearly see the writing on the page. Feel free to decorate this card however you want. On another piece of card stock (I used brown to resemble a gingerbread man) I stenciled a gingerbread man using the cookie cutter to cut out and paste on the front section of the ingredients and directions card. Make sure to leave room at the top, inner corner to punch a hole.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup of butter
  • 3/4 cup molasses
  • 1 egg, slightly beaten
  • icing and candy to decorate

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350˚F
  2. Empty contents of jar into a large mixing bowl
  3. Stir to blend together
  4. Mix in butter, molasses, and egg
  5. Cover and refrigerate (1 hr)
  6. Roll dough to 1/4″ thick on a lightly floured surface
  7. Cut into shapes with a cookie cutter
  8. Place on lightly greased cookie sheet and bake (10-12 mins)
  9. Decorate and enjoy!

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Place enough fabric over the top of the mason jar to cover the metal lid – I chose red to match the holiday theme! Secure the fabric to the jar by wrapping twine around the lid. Make sure to loop in the ingredients and directions card as well as the gingerbread man cookie cutter before tying a bow.

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michelle-and-noodlesgoldleavesNow you’re ready to gift, bake some cookies, and relax!

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Happy holidays!

-Michelle

Candy Advent Calendar

_mg_8162goldleavesIt’s that wonderful time of year – December is finally here! We’ve been overwhelmingly busy with final exams and packing for winter break, but decided to take a day off to craft and embrace the holiday spirit together before we leave for home.

Advent calendars are the most exciting Christmas decoration thanks to the sweet surprise that hides behind each day. Usually we get the cardboard ones where you punch out the chocolate each day, but this year we decided to make it more interesting. We loaded up on our favorite candies (pretty much all of them to be honest) and wrapped them up like mini Christmas gifts. The end result is so festive and cute, plus the wooden structure is sturdy and reusable so we never have to go back to the plain old cardboard calendars again. Because we were a little late starting this one, we embraced the excuse to eat five candies in one night, and there’s no shame in you doing the same!


Materials:

  • A long piece of wood
  • White spray paint
  • 25 nails
  • Black acrylic paint
  • A thin paint brush
  • Wrapping paper (we mostly used tissue paper)
  • 25 small candies
  • Ribbon
  • String (we used the red & white twisted kind)
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Command strips for hanging

Use a piece of wood that is long enough to hold all 25 candies. We found this scrap wood at the UCLA sculpture lab – it doesn’t need to be fancy. Set it down outside on paper or newspaper and coat the wood with white spray paint. We only did one layer for a more rustic look but feel free to do another for a cleaner style. Allow to dry completely.

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Carefully measure out where each number will go. It’s been a while since we took math and this took us a few tries, but it will look much better if it is evenly spaced apart. We marked each space with a small pencil mark. Then using whatever font you would like, paint the numbers over each dot. If you don’t have faith in your calligraphy skills, you could easily use number stickers from any craft store.

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Next, hammer the nails into the pencil dots. You want them to be secure, but still protruding quite a bit in order to hold the candies (Note: doing this in a Christmas sweater will add to the festive vibe).

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Pick out your 25 candy surprises. We opted for a large variety of things from chocolates to fruity chewy candies. Pick what you like, because you will be the one eating them! The goal is to find candy with small, easy-to-wrap packaging. Some things, like the starbursts, you can divide up into three separate days. We poured the skittles into little plastic baggies that would be wrapped into cute pouches.

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Wrap all of the candy. Warning, this is not a craft for those who hate gift wrapping. This is probably what it feels like to be Santa Claus for mice. We used tissue paper except for the plaid gift wrap, and we used variations of gold ribbon to create consistency.

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Cut different lengths of string (so that the mini presents will all hang at different heights) and tape them in a loop to the back of each candy gift.

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Using command strips, attach the wooden piece to the wall. Hang the gifts onto the advent calendar in a random order. We tried to arrange them based on wrapping color and the length at which they hang.

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Now relax, indulge your sweet tooth, and let the countdown begin!

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Happy December!

-Kirby and Michelle

Lavender Sachets

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Kirby & Lola in front of the harvested lavender field in Ojai

This past July, I spent a week in Ojai with friends and family. It was such a magical place with Spanish-style homes, flowering trees, and roadside farm stands that used the honor system. Every morning there would be tomatoes and fresh eggs for us to take, trusting that we would leave the money we owed. Each night we grilled outside under the stars then played games and drank wine. It was perfect. There was also a huge lavender field in our backyard that had just been harvested and the air was filled with the floral perfume. As my dad and I walked Lola (our family Cocker Spaniel) in the evenings, a certain topic kept recurring – how much my Grandma Carylon would love it there. No one would appreciate the vibrant flowers, the fresh produce, and the warm sunshine more than her and we quickly began plotting how to convince her to move so that we could visit all the time.

As a souvenir, I brought home a bag full of dried lavender from the harvest, but wasn’t quite sure what to do with it. Recently it dawned on me to make homemade sachets to send to my grandmother, a small sample of the place my dad and I knew she would fall in love with.

These were very easy to make – keep in mind the most I’ve sewn in my life is a button. With lacy ribbon and fabric paint, they are easily customizable and smell so incredible, a perfect gift. I plan to make a bunch more as Christmas gifts… and maybe a few for myself!


Materials:

  • Non-stretchy fabric (I used cotton)
  • Needle & thread
  • Scissors
  • Ribbon
  • Fabric paint
  • Dried lavender

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Cut your fabric into long rectangular strips. When you fold them in half, they should be a little larger than you want the final sachet to be. Don’t worry about loose threads and messy edges, they will be hidden.

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Take one piece of fabric and fold it in half so that the back of the fabric is facing the outside. Using a cross-stitch (don’t worry, I had to google that, too), sew the sides, leaving about half an itch from the edges. Then carefully fold down the top and sew all the way around, this time leaving about a quarter inch from the top. The fabric should look like an inside-out pouch by now.

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Turn the bag inside out so that the seams are hidden. At this point you can decorate the sachet however you like. I monogrammed the navy blue one with my Grandma’s initials (CC) and sewed crochet ribbon across the bottom of the yellow one. I left the flower printed pouch as is so that the sachets wouldn’t look too busy all together. Once you finish decorating, pour the dried lavender into the bag, filling it 2/3 of the way.

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Carefully pinch the fabric so that the pouch is tightly filled, then sew it shut to secure the lavender inside. Use a thin ribbon and bow to cover the seam and finish the decoration on the bag.

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That’s all there is to it, now you are ready to place them in your clothing drawers and be the best smelling lady around! (I made sure to thoroughly test them out on my clothes before sending them to my grandma).

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Happy sewing!

-Kirby

 

Thanksgiving Place Cards

When I was a little girl, I so badly wanted to be involved in the Thanksgiving preparations, but could not be trusted with knives. So for the first few Thanksgivings I can remember, my official job title was “table decorator”, and boy did I take that job seriously.

I used to sketch out what the table would look like weeks before my mom would even begin planning the menu. As soon as Fall started, I began collecting colorful fallen leaves and storing them in a ziplock bag beneath my bed, so that I would be prepared when it came time to building my masterful centerpiece. I still remember the hand-traced turkeys with wonky, misspelled names that adorned the plates when I was first enlisted for the job, and the glitter mess that lasted for weeks when I thought sparkly pumpkins would be a good idea for a centerpiece.

While I’ve been old enough to help out in the kitchen for a long time, the table decorations have remained a personal tradition, and to me, are (almost) as important as the food. This year for Thanksgiving I am traveling to my mom’s house in Santa Fe, New Mexico. I am beyond excited for a week of much needed mom time (anyone else as excited for the Gilmore girls revival as we are?!). We will be cooking  the whole Thanksgiving dinner for our close friends and I, of course, will decorate. Here are three different place card ideas that I’ve come up with for the table this year; I will be using the gold leaves, a sophisticated decoration that isn’t too difficult so I can focus on what really matters… the food!


Until last week, I had never seen a persimmon before. A good friend handed me one that she got at the Hollywood Farmer’s market and I instantly thought of a pumpkin, a smooth and dainty little pumpkin. Festive and vibrant – a perfect addition to a thanksgiving table. To make this, I curled a piece of thin copper wire about 7 times using the tip of my scissors, then pulled it apart to make a coil. I then inserted the coil into the top of the persimmon. I curled another piece of wire two or three times, and left it curled so that it could hold the name tag, which was a small rectangular piece of card stock. I inserted the name tag, and that’s it!

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I recently bought a large pack of colorful paper and had fun layering the different colors to make these striped place cards. These are so easy, but I love the vibrant and funky edge they bring to the table. Simply layer the sheets of paper in the order you would like them (I  used six sheets); the stripes should look exactly how you want them to on the cards. Then glue the sheets of paper together and cut them into rectangles. Bend the rectangles in half, so that one side has the stripes on it. I used a thin black sharpie pen to write the names, careful to do so on a lighter color to create contrast.

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I found these pretty leaves at Michaels, but they could easily be done using real leaves if you happen to live somewhere that has seasons. For these place cards, I used gold acrylic paint to coat the leaves, then wrote the names in the center with a fine sharpie pen. I used the tip of my scissors to twist thin copper wire so that it would hold the leaf, and again at the bottom to create a spiral stand. While these are easy to make, they as also incredibly elegant and will surely impress your guests.

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Happy Thanksgiving!

-Kirby

Autumn Leaf Sugar Cookies

glu-logo-copyApparently we are 54 days into Fall, but here in L.A. it has been above 90 degrees for more days than we can count. Instead of cozy sweaters, knit hats, and hot lattes in hand, we’ve been trekking to class in shorts and t-shirts, wiping the sweat from our brows before downing iced drinks. While we try not to ever take the endless sunshine for granted, we do miss the seasonal changes that really help transition into the holiday spirit.

In an effort to fix this, we made these autumn leaf cookies for the apartment, a simple reminder that it is indeed Fall. They are a nice break from the meticulous detail that we tend to lean towards when decorating cookies.


Ingredients & Materials:

  • Sugar cookies (you can find our recipe here)
  • Royal icing (you can find our recipe here)
  • Food coloring of your choice (we used copper, red, orange, yellow, and green)
  • A cooling rack
  • Paper towels or newspaper (anything you don’t mind ruining with icing)
  • A spoon

_mg_6569Roll your sugar cookie dough 1/4 inch thick and use a maple leaf cookie cutter to cut your shapes. Bake them for 6-8 minutes at 400 ºF and then set aside to cool.

While the cookies bake, make your royal icing. Be sure to add a little bit of water. These cookies don’t have any detail in them and rely on the icing being able to run off the cookie. However, it should still be very thick and goopy. Divide the icing into as many colors as you want to use, and mix in the dye. Try to look at leaves for inspiration; you want the colors to be more natural looking and less neon, otherwise the cookies will look more like rainbows than leaves.

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Evenly distribute the cookies on a cooling rack with a thick layer of paper towels underneath. Using a spoon, pour the green icing over the cookies until they are covered.

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Allow to sit for 10 minutes, then pour the next shade (in this case a greenish yellow) over most of the cookie, leaving one end the initial green color.

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Again, allow them to sit for 10 minutes, then pour the next color (in this case golden yellow) over the cookies, leaving the previous colors still exposed on one side. Keep repeating this process until all of the colors have been laid down.

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The cookies should gradually transition from green to yellow to orange to red. Don’t worry if the icing looks messy and is mixing together. The imperfections are what give it the marbled ombre look. You also may need to clean up with edges with your fingers or a toothpick since the multiple layers of icing is so thick and slightly deforms the leaf shape. Allow to cool completely and enjoy, whether you are in warm weather or cold!

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Happy decorating!

Michelle & Kirby

Sugar Cookies & Royal Icing

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We love to bake, which might be obvious considering this blog. And by bake we mostly mean decorate. While our families might argue that eating our sweets is the best part, we love coming up with creative ways to decorate desserts for specific holidays, seasons, or celebrations.

Sugar cookies with royal icing are a staple in our lives. We make a batch at least once a month. Though simple in flavor, their decorating possibilities are endless. This cookie recipe holds its shape so well, unlike many recipes we’ve fiddled with in the past that turn into formless blobs once baked. Once we discovered this one, we haven’t gone back. Pair them with royal icing and your design possibilities are endless.


Sugar Cookie Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 5 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt

In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar with an electric mixer. Once smooth, beat in the eggs and vanilla.

Stir in the flour, baking powder, and salt, and mix until the dough is formed. Don’t be afraid to use your hands. If it feels too sticky, add a little more flour.

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Wrap the dough in wax paper or plastic and chill for at least one hour. Preheat the oven to 400 ºF (204 ºC). Roll the dough out on a floured surface until it is approximately 1/4 inch thick. Cut the shapes that you want and then using a spatula, carefully place the cut outs onto a greased cookie sheet, leaving an inch between the cookies.

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Now the next step may seem pointless, but it is THE #1 SECRET to perfect cut out cookies. Place your sheets in the fridge for a few minutes before baking. Once the sheet is cool and the cookie dough is cold to the touch, remove them and immediately place them in the oven. Bake for 6-8 minutes, until the edges are barely brown. The extra few minutes of refrigeration is the key to keeping the shapes that you so carefully cut out.

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Cool your cookies on a cooling rack and then onto the fun part – decorating!


Royal Icing Ingredients 

  • 4 egg whites
  • 6 cups powdered sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar

Sift the powdered sugar and cream of tartar together, then set aside. Beat the egg whites until frothy. Pour them into the powdered sugar mixer and beat with an electric mixer on high speed until the icing forms stiff peaks.

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Divide the icing in half. Leave one half as it is, the thick icing is what you want to use to make outlines and details.

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Add a tiny bit of water to the other half until it is smooth and slowly pours from a spoon. It is always better to add too little water than too much! The runny icing is what you will use to flood your cookies. From here you can mix the colors that you plan to use and distribute them into your piping bags.

 

Happy  baking!

Michelle & Kirby

Fall Leaf Gift Tags

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Autumn has always been my favorite time of the year. Kickstarting the holiday season with my birthday, followed by Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Eve, I’m rarely seen without a beaming smile on my face. When I was younger, admittedly, one of my favorite parts about this season had to do with gifts. I can still remember the uncontained excitement having just opened my Barbie Dream House at my 6th birthday. And whenever my parents left me alone with the Christmas tree I’d sneakily shake my gifts hoping to discover their contents.

As I’ve grown older, gifts have remained a major highlight in my holiday celebrations, but I’ve become more interested in giving them than receiving them. The act of searching for the perfect gift that will make someone smile or laugh is so fulfilling and I honestly get more excited watching others open gifts than I do opening my own.

Personalized wrapping is the best way to elevate gifts, making them even more special. These leaf gift tags are the perfect addition to any fall gifts, whether it’s tied onto a Thanksgiving hostess gift or attached to an October/November birthday present. My sister, Nicole, recently moved to Oakland with her boyfriend and these leaf tags were a nice touch to the housewarming gift I sent.


Materials:

  • Paper (I used red and brown cardstock, and white and gold striped wrapping paper)
  • Scissors
  • Gold leaf pen  (I swear by this one here)
  • Pencil/pen for tracing
  • A leaf to trace (you can print a cutout if you don’t have one)
  • Hole punch
  • Twine
  • Wrapping paper

Trace the leaf onto each of your pieces of paper, then carefully cut them out. I used three but feel free to add or remove layers depending on what you like. Stack the leaves and punch a hole near the stem.

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Add the gold details to the leaf cutouts. On the red leaf I painted half of it solid gold. Be generous with layers to avoid streaks. For the brown leaf I did a simple gold outline, which gives plenty of room to write a note for Nicole. I left the gold and white paper alone since it already had plenty of gold sparkles.

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Wrap your gift and tie with twine. Then stack the leaves once again and loop the twine through the holes before you complete the knot. I love the simple, rustic look of plain white giftwrap and twine, but the subtle sparkle and color in the leaves gives it a warm holiday feel.

 

Happy gifting!

 

-Michelle